1619 Project

Alkek Library has a new exhibit featuring the 1619 Project, a New York Times program by reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones. The New York Times describes the project as a “major initiative … observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery”. The publication includes essays, essays, poems, short fiction, and a photo essay. The 1619 Project speaks to the history and truth of 400 years of slavery in the United States that began in August 1619, when the first enslaved Africans were brought to North America. Slavery’s legacy has persisted throughout this country’s society, from education to the criminal justice system.

The exhibit features a copy of the original publication, provided by the Texas Student Government at a Diversity Week Lunch and Learn event. Publications by Dr. Ron Johnson and Dr. Dwonna Goldstone are also included.

The exhibit is in support of the new African American Studies minor that began offering courses Fall 2019. Please visit the exhibit on the 3rd floor of Alkek Library; the glass case is located in front of the Checkout Desk. https://guides.library.txstate.edu/AAST


#1619Project  @1619Project

Literary Passings: Ernest Gaines (A Gathering Of Old Men)

Here’s our copy of Ernest Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.

From this autobiography:

Novelist Ernest J. Gaines, acclaimed author of The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, and other novels about the struggles of African Americans in rural Louisiana, died at his home in Oscar, La., Tuesday at the age of 86.

Gaines died in his sleep of cardiac arrest, according to The Associated Press, citing the Baton Rouge Area Foundation. He is survived by his wife Dianne Saulney Gaines, four stepchildren and nine siblings.

The son of sharecroppers, Gaines was born on a plantation in Pointe Coupee Parish, near Baton Rouge. He attended school for little more than five months out of the year. But that was more education than his family before him had received. He would say later in life that his ear for the stories of his elders was developed as he wrote letters for adults who couldn’t read or write.

In the late 1940’s, at the age of 15, his family moved to the northern California city of Vallejo, about 30 miles north of San Francisco. He told interviewer Lawrence Bridges that in California he could do something that had been forbidden in the South: visit a library. Gaines later attended San Francisco State University. His early writing earned him a Wallace Stegner fellowship at Stanford University.

 

Faculty: Get Print Journal Articles Delivered To You with FADS

Faculty Article Delivery Service (FADS)

Alkek Library now delivers electronic copies of articles from our print journal collection right to your desktop. This service, called Faculty Article Delivery Service or FADS, is available to faculty at either the San Marcos or Round Rock locations.

Here’s how to request an article through FADS:

Simply use the Interlibrary Loan system to request any print article, by filling out an online loan request using your ILLiad account. The interlibrary loan staff will take your request and either digitize the article on demand if we subscribe to the journal in print OR obtain the article via interlibrary loan (if we do not subscribe to the journal).
You will receive the article in a timely manner via your ILLiad account and can access the digital version on your desktop in your office or home– no more trips to the library to find and copy the article!
Please note that articles available in our Research Databases, accessible from the library homepage, are not included in the FADS or ILLiad service. The library licenses several thousand full-text e-journals, providing faculty with easy access to the journal literature at work and home or on the road.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Interlibrary Loan office at 245-4893 or via email.

New Alkek Library READ Poster with Dr. Erina Duganne

READ Poster - Erina Duganne_Chisel_draft 2

 

Announcing Alkek Library’s new READ poster for 2019. Dr. Erina Duganne’s testimonial won the spring Tell Us Your Story competition. Dr. Duganne’s testimonial is a compelling narrative about how the library is an integral part of her mentorship to her students and for her research. Read her full testimonial below:

“As an associate professor and area coordinator of the art history program in the School of Art and Design, my teaching and research depend on being able to easily access physical books and journals. One of my favorite activities at Alkek Library is to browse the stacks because you never know what resources you will discover while looking for something else. I teach my students the importance of using the online search catalog as a jumping-off point towards exploration within the stacks. I encourage students to pull many books and journals off the shelves and to spend as much or as little time with them as they need. I also urge them to think about these resources not just for their textual contents but also their material specificity. This assignment comes from my own experiences browsing books in Alkek Library and finding something unexpectedly which would go on to make a major impact on my thinking about a subject. Books are the building blocks of art historical research. We are exceedingly fortunate to have Alkek Library as a resource for our teaching and research.”

 

Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

Author Picks: Deborah Eisenberg

All Deborah Eisenberg books here.

from the New York Times Magazine:

In spite of her desultory M.O., Eisenberg has somehow managed to produce one of the most original and accomplished bodies of work in contemporary literature. With the exception of a play, a book about the painter Jennifer Bartlett and a handful of critical essays, her output consists entirely of short stories, and yet as a portraitist and interpreter of the moral and political chaos of American life she is the equal of any novelist of the past 30 years. Her stories rove from the Midwest, where she was born, to the metropolitan centers and foreign outposts of American power and concern the fate of artists and intellectuals, bankers, movie stars and C.I.A. apparatchiks, as well as drifters, dropouts and dead-enders, the politically displaced and the existentially homeless. Like their creator, her dramatis personae are beings of an almost extraterrestrial sensitivity and confusion; they look at the world with a kind of radical naïveté, as though they had never before encountered cars, buildings, trees or clouds, let alone the ambiguous workings of human social life. Just how strange it is to be that lost and lonely creature, oneself, is a realization that Eisenberg’s world-dazed men and women arrive at time and again.

Featured Author: Abraham Verghese, Medical Nonfiction Writer

All Abraham Verghese books here.

I first became aware of Abraham Verghese through his best-selling book, My Own Country, which chronicled the AIDS epidemic in a small Tennessee city (which also happens to be my hometown). Dr. Verghese wrote the book based on his own experiences, and I can tell you that it is completely accurate.

Since then, Dr. Verghese has gone on to write nonfiction about losing a tennis partner to addiction as well as fiction. Dr. Verghese currently works at Stanford University.

Read more in this biography

 

Nutshell And Demystified Books Provide Great Introductions To Complex Topics

These books are great introductions to legal topics such as arbitration, contracts, corporate finance, copyright law and more.

You need a good introduction to a HARD topic. Written to get you started, and as intelligent as you are.You already know what the median and mode are; you need a discussion of Bayesian probability, or 12 ways of looking at correlation, or population distribution, etc.

Enter the wonderful Demystified series.

Here are some examples.

Business Stats Demystified.
Stats Demystified
Probability Demystified

Alkek Library vs. Google (Video Tutorial)

Google does not search all the information in the world! Even though libraries and other institutions make their resources available full text online, Google does not search these web sites (otherwise known as the deep web).

Instead, what you’ll typically get on a Google search is a lot of random info that won’t be of use to you in writing an academic paper.

Video tutorial below: