How To Find Keywords Within 5 Words of Each Other

Bet you didn’t know about “proximity” searches in the Ebscohost family of databases. These commands allow you to search 2 words that occur in the text near each other.

The upshot of which is: the article is more likely to be written about your topic if your words occur close to one other.

(Ebscohost is the name of the publisher that brings you several of our databases. You may know them by their proper names, like Academic Search Complete. Once inside an Ebsco database, you can always “choose databases” to search several Ebscohost databases at once.)

Here’s the official directions from Ebscohost:

Proximity Searches

You can use a proximity search to search for two or more words that occur within a specified number of words (or fewer) of each other in the databases. Proximity searching is used with a Keyword or Boolean search.

The proximity operators are composed of a letter (N or W) and a number (to specify the number of words). The proximity operator is placed between the words that are to be searched, as follows:

Near Operator (N) – N5 finds the words if they are within five words of one another regardless of the order in which they appear.

For example, type tax N5 reform to find results that would match tax reform as well as reform of income tax.

Within Operator (W) – In the following example, W8 finds the words if they are within eight words of one another and in the order in which you entered them.

For example, type tax W8 reform to find results that would match tax reform but would not match reform of income tax.

In addition, multiple terms can be used on either side of the operator. See the following examples:

  • (baseball or football or basketball) N5 (teams or players)
  • oil W3 (disaster OR clean-up OR contamination)

Featured Author: Michel Houellebecq (The Elementary Particles)

Michel Houellebecq books here.

A good introduction from this article:

Michel Houellebecq is, simply, a satirist. He likes to take what’s happening now and imagine what would happen if it kept on happening. That’s what satirists do. Jonathan Swift saw that the English were treating the Irish as animals; what if they took the next natural step and ate their babies?

Houellebecq is not merely a satirist but—more unusually—a sincere satirist, genuinely saddened by the absurdities of history and the madnesses of mankind. He doesn’t “delight in depicting our follies,” as reviewers like to say; he’s made miserable by them. French reviews and American previews of “Submission” might leave one with the impression of a sardonic, teeth-baring polemic about the evils of Islam, the absurdities of feminism, the terrible demoralization of French life. In truth, the tone of the book is melancholic rather than polemical. Life makes Houellebecq blue. “The totality of animals, the crushing majority of men, live without ever finding the least need for justification,” his narrator, a literature professor at the Sorbonne, reflects. “They live because they live, and that’s all, and that’s how they reason—and then I suppose they die because they die, and this, in their eyes, ends the analysis.” That’s Houellebecq’s typical tone; the book’s virtues lie in his mordant, disabused eye for depressing details of French life.

Even if, sentence by sentence, Houellebecq is not a writer to envy, certainly he does have a voice of his own, one of slightly resigned sociological detachment. In the very first pages of the new book, he remarks, apropos the uses of a university degree in literature, that “a young woman applying for a job as a saleswoman at Céline or Hermès will, in the first place, have to take care of her appearance, but a literature degree could constitute a secondary attribute pleasing to the employer, suggesting a certain intellectual agility that might indicate a potential evolution of her career—literature, in place of useful skills, still has a positive connotation in the domain of the luxury industry.” You master Proust to become a better salesgirl, and what else would you expect? The commodification of the world and the art and the people in it leaves Houellebecq unexcited.

 

Children’s Songs

An article in the February 2015 issue of School Library Journal presents Kindie Rock! Many of the titles Warren Truitt includes in his article are available at Alkek…so did you know that Alkek Library offers children’s songs on CD and streaming? These can be fun to listen to in the car and online that you can stream from anywhere. Imagine a classroom of young children and how much fun their day is to learn as they listen to music. Children’s songs on CD are available on the 3rd floor of the Library and via the catalog online. Ever heard of “piggyback songs“? Alkek Library’s General Collection has many of these fun sets too.

Whaddaya Think of That Rocket Ship Run Dan Zanes & Friends - All Around the Kitchen! Crazy Videos & Concert Songs! Taxi

I Can Do it By Myself Camp Lisa On The Good Ship Lollipop Kids Cars & Campfires
    

Use Lexis Nexis for Foreign News

Here’s a great resource for print news (magazines and newspapers) from India, Asia, Africa and the Middle East (among others): Lexis-Nexis.

Not just recent months but the last several years in fact.

Covers topics of local foreign interest, not just different takes on international issues (although it does that as well).

Go to Lexis Nexis, and choose News, then Newspapers and Wires. Foreign Language is an option as well.

February is Black History Month

Alkek Library’s Juvenile Collection on the 3rd floor offers many excellent titles related to the history of the African American experience.  A place to start might be many of the Coretta Scott King and Carter G. Woodson titles currently on the 3rd floor in the Juvenile Exhibit cases.  The exhibit includes many books by notable African American authors and illustrators as well as folktales/folklore (Brer Rabbit, John Henry)

This History Channel has many resources on their page attributed to Black History Month. African American resources are also available at theLibrary of Congress sites dedicated to African American History Month and African American Commemoration.

Many famous speeches are available at http://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history-major-speeches and the Alkek Library subscribes to the African American Experience database.

BHM

 

New Biz Databases: First Research and IBIS World

So you have to do an industry analysis for your management class?  Now we have two new databases that put everything in one location and have better categories of businesses too!

First Research - A great one stop location for industry surveys and analysis.

Contains over 900 Industry Segments, updated constantly with monthly statistics and indicators as well as quarterly trend updates, and State Profiles to monitor monthly employment, business and real estate trends in each of the 50 US states.

IBISWorld

Subjects NAICS collection analyzes industries at the 5-digit level offering the latest content on 700 industries. Each report consists of 30 to 40 pages of key statistics and analysis on market characteristics, operating conditions, current and forecast performance, major industry participants and more.
Coverage Current
Format U.S. Industry reports
Type Other Database

Featured Author: Michael Lewis (Liar’s Poker, Moneyball)

 

Michael Lewis is one of America’s best known financial writers.  His book Moneyball was made into a motion picture starring Brad Pitt, and his book The Big Short is also getting the motion picture treatment. He is also the author of the book Blind Side, which was made into a very successful movie.

All Michael Lewis books here.

Here are a couple of books by Michael Lewis that I’ve written about previously.

Liar’s Poker is an account of the high pressure deals on Wall Street during the 1980s. The author, Michael Lewis, was a bright and very young recent college graduate who suddenly found himself making insane amounts of money trading bonds on the floor of Salomon Brothers.

Lewis recounts his adventures in learning to trade the market, the profane culture of the brokerage, and playing Machiavellian office politics. It’s pretty dramatic, with lots of high stakes deals, backbiting and secret alliances, and the stench of greed. It’s also how the financial world operates.

Moneyball is about an unlikely success: how the cash strapped Oakland A’s baseball team found ways to win without the ability to afford highly priced skills. One simply must find players with unusual and overlooked talents. One does this by identifying talents that no-one else can see – a tough business in a 100-year old game that few thought held any more secrets.

Those people were wrong. Baseball did have secrets. And these were ferreted out by Bill James, an eccentric and charming former night watchman from Kansas. Famed business writer Michael Lewis (Liar’s Poker) tackles the subject of how the Oakland A’s turned baseball shibboleths on their head by using these unconventional insights gleaned from reams of statistical data.