Featured Author: Jane Jacobs

Jane Jacobs was a fascinating thinker, economist, urban studies and public policy theorist. Her work addresses the growth of cities and their economies.

Here are some interesting ideas she poses in her work The Economy of Cities.

Why adding new work to old work is crucial to growing an economy (instead of merely dividing existing work more)

Why loosely structured and inefficient economies are better suited to survive change.
Why cities predated agriculture as we know it.
How cities can replace imported goods with their own industries.
Why some villages grow into cities and some do not.
How the design of urban spacies can either promote order or hinder it.

If you are studying urban studies, public policy or economics you need to read her.

For some reason, she has two entries in the catalog. One here, the other here.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Printing @ Alkek

We now have BYOD printing (bring your own device).

Here’s how it works.


Using your Texas State e-mail account, send an email to one of these addresses (duplex-alk@txstate.edu or letter-alk@txstate.edu (duplex is for double-sided print jobs, letter is for single- sided print jobs).

Attach any documents would like to print to the email.  The body of your email also show up as a print job if you want to print that way.

Go to a print release station to release your print jobs.  There are print release stations available on every floor of Alkek library.


Navigate to http://printeron.its.txstate.edu/

Click of the print button.  Login with your Texas State netID and password.  Expand all of the categories and select a printer you want to print two.  Use duplex for two-sided print jobs and letter for single-sided print jobs.  Browse for an upload the document you want to print.  Click continue once the document is selected for upload.  Click continue once more after adjusting page sizes.  Wait for the job to upload.  Once the page displays complete go to a print release station to release your job.


Scarecrow Press – Great Overviews for Virtually Any Topic

All Scarecrow Press books here. The first one somehow isn’t Scarecrow and then the rest are.

I have fond memories of Scarecrow Press. If you needed an introduction or overview of almost anything – the history of Panama, women music educators, anthropological theorists, you name it – you would eventually run into Scarecrow Press.

Just a couple of hours reading these books did wonders to increase your comprehension of advanced or graduate-level courses.

You can either search the link above or type in your keyword and then the word Scarecrow.

Fall Library eNews is Live-Are You on the Cover?

Stay connected with Alkek Library through our eNews, including information about services, collections, and events at Alkek and the Round Rock Campus Library. Hope you enjoy the cover picture, a collage of freshmen selfies from Bobcat Preview, created by our new UX Librarian, Tricia Boucher!

Library eNews (also accessible at https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6297)


Director’s Message: What’s Next at Alkek

Step Up Your Research: Subject Librarians: Your Key to Successful Research

Meet Our Staff: Tricia Boucher, User Experience Librarian

Copyright Corner: Posting Materials on TRACS and Fair Use

Student Voices: Come for the Stories, Stay for the Studies

News From the North: Resources You Would Expect and More

Collections Spotlight: Shall We Play? Toys at Alkek

Digital Collections: The National Tour of Texas

At the Wittliff Collections: Marc Simmons: Southwestern Treasures

Texas State University History: Campus History from the Student Perspective

How to Find Primary Sources

Primary sources are documents that are direct records of an event, raw data, documents, magazines or newspapers from the time, photos or other material created at the time of an event. Even audio recordings, buildings, or just about anything could be considered primary sources.

Our historical primary source databases are located here.

Again, if you’re working in the field of history, you can search our catalog for published collections of primary sources.

Our history maven Margaret Vavarek suggests the searching the following key words in the catalog: Correspondence, Description and Travel, Diaries, Interviews, Personal Narratives, Sources, Letters or Speeches

Another way to identify primary sources is to go to Dissertation Theses Full Text, find relevant dissertations (they are fulltext online) and read their bibliographies.  You could then search to see if we our other libraries have the primary sources mentioned in these bibliographies.

Primary sources in other disciplines can mean studies, experiment results or original research. These can be found by searching the appropriate databases and finding articles that contain primary research results.

FabJob Books Help You Start Your Career Or Business

All FabJob books here.

FabJob books are well-written, easy-to-read guides to how to get a job or start a business in your chosen field. There are books on becoming a coffee shop owner, a fashion designer, a secondhand close retailer and more. Covers everything from the credentials you might need, to capital requirements and the nuts and bolts of running that business.

Highly recommended.