The Internet Wayback Machine Archives The Web

The Internet changes constantly. Ever wonder what happens to content that’s taken down?

A handful (but growing) number of organizations archive web content. A “picture” is taken every few days and stored.

The main Internet archive is called the Wayback Machine.

From The Economist:

The Wayback Machine’s inventor, Brewster Kahle, is an internet entrepreneur, philanthropist and computer whizz who helped design Mr Hillis’s ground-breaking Connection Machine in the 1980s. In 1996 he founded a non-profit organisation, the Internet Archive, to create a free internet library capable of storing a copy of every web page of every website ever to go online. The Wayback Machine allows users to view the library’s archived web pages as they appeared when published. Today the Internet Archive also includes texts, audio, moving images and software. At the last count, its collection contained more than 150 billion items.

Search The Wayback Machine Here

Even though we have the Wayback Machine, it is not a perfect solution and does not capture all of the web. Here’s a critique of our current storage methods of the web. 

Dressing For A Job Interview

Do you know how to mix and match different patterns?  If your jacket has a wide check pattern and you want to wear a tie with dots, what is the correct call? Can you wear a jacket with a check pattern with a tie with a check pattern?

Check out this timeless advice from men’s clothing legend Alan Flusser.

(This book is located in the oversized section on floor 7.)

Enlighten us, Mr. Flusser:

If using different patterns in jacket and tie, keep the size close.
If same pattern in jacket and tie, vary size of pattern.

The main female professional dress category is here but here are some good titles:

Examples: What to Wear, Where: The How-To Handbook for any Style Situation

Work It: Visual Therapy’s Guide to Your Ultimate Career Wardrobe.

Featured Author: Barbara Ehrenreich, Social Journalist (Nickel and Dimed)

Barbara Ehrenreich Is a journalist and writer who is willing to tackle some very tough subjects.  You may have heard of her book Nickel And Dimed: On Not Getting By In America. The author took a series of low paying jobs to see if you could actually make ends meet.  It makes for some pretty interesting reading!

My other favorite book by this author is Bright-Sided.  This book has a very interesting idea: that Americans mistake critical analysis for pessimism and this inability to address our problems damages social discourse.

Recommended for anyone who wants a good read and people interested in current affairs.

Link to review of Nickel and Dimed in Dissent Magazine

Five jobs and three cities later, Ehrenreich concludes that many of today’s jobs don’t pay enough to support one person—much less a whole family. She works two jobs at a time andeats “chopped meat, beans, cheese and noodles.” But in all three cities, rent gets the
better of her economy. “You don’t need a degree in economics,” she writes, “to see that
wages are too low and rents too high.” But this is a mathematical conclusion, which could
have been made with the aid of a calculator. By taking these jobs herself, Ehrenreich is able to capture the material details of workplace indignity.”

Read Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Bourdain material here.

The world lost a great foodie and educator in Anthony Bourdain.

We knew Anthony Bourdain first as the host of No Reservations, but before that TV gig, he was a multidecade veteran of the restaurant biz.

Kitchen Confidential ocuses on his initiation into the restaurant industry – both as a worker and later as an owner. It is invaluable reading for anyone thinking – like some of my entrepreneur students – of opening a restaurant or bar.

This is how it goes down – the rhythm of work, your inevitably dysfunctional staff, how the kitchen is run, how to pay for food and secure supplies, etc…

A lot of hilarious and insightful information.

Literary Passings: Sci-Fi Master Harlan Ellison

Harlan Ellison works here.

From this obituary:

Ellison produced more than 1,800 pieces of writing, beginning in 1949 when his hometown Cleveland News gave him his first byline when he was 15.

His best-known published works include his 1959 debut novel, Web of the City; the novellas Mefisto in Onyx and A Boy and his Dog — which was turned into a 1975 post-apocalyptic feature starring Don Johnson; and the short story “I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream.”

Stephen King, in Danse Macabre, his 1981 homage to horror fiction, praised Ellison’s Strange Wine collection of short stories for being among the best published between 1950-80.

Television beckoned throughout his long career, and Ellison wrote scripts for incarnations of The Outer Limits decades apart. He lent his expertise to The Twilight Zone revival in the 1980s and to Babylon 5 in the 1990s. In

Texas Authors: Robert E Howard, Creator of Conan the Barbarian

All Robert E Howard books here

Bet you didn’t know that Conan the Barbarian was actually from Texas.The creator of Conan was Robert E. Howard, who spent most of his life in Cross Plains Texas, just outside of Abilene.

Also: Vincent D’Onofrio and Renée Zellweger were in a movie called the Whole Wide World which is about Robert E. Howard’s life in Cross Plains.

Featured Author: Abraham Verghese, Medical Nonfiction Writer

All Abraham Verghese books here.

I first became aware of Abraham Verghese through his best-selling book, My Own Country, which chronicled the AIDS epidemic in a small Tennessee city (which also happens to be my hometown). Dr. Verghese wrote the book based on his own experiences, and I can tell you that it is completely accurate.

Since then, Dr. Verghese has gone on to write nonfiction about losing a tennis partner to addiction as well as fiction. Dr. Verghese currently works at Stanford University.

Read more in this biography