Getting Book Reviews And Why They’re Important

Don’t forget book reviews! Most databases will allow you to select book reviews as a source type. Reason: find out a book’s reputation, any hidden context, its significance among experts, and any problems with the book. Most authors are pretty persuasive and you need a second opinion.

Be sure to limit results to “review” or “book review,” depending on the interface.

Complete list of book review databases here

Favorites:

New York Times archives is a good option for nonacademic books published before 2006.

JSTOR is another good one for many subjects.

Wilson OmniFile FullText. A good grabbag. You can limit it to search “book reviews” by a particular discipline.

These are not your only options but are some of the best. You can always check your favorite database to see if it has book reviews.

Wikipedia Hoaxes News Roundup

Here are some recent articles documenting maliciously wrong Wikipedia information, and even some articles about entirely fictitious entities. In many cases, the wrong information stayed on Wikipedia for years and was cited by other sources. Food for thought if you are using Wikipedia.

I Accidentally Started a Wikipedia Hoax

The 10 Biggest Hoaxes In  Wikipedia’s First 10 Years

Read About the Infamous Nonexistent Battle That Stayed on Wikipedia for Five Years

Wikipedia’s own entry on Wikipedia Hoaxes (yes, we know)

 

February Library eNews Is Live!

We’re excited to present the February issue of Library eNews, featuring services and resources to serve our Texas State community. This issue introduces our new 3D printing service, provides tips on career exploration and honing research skills, showcases our University Archivist and a poem written for Alkek’s “Tell Us Your Story” competition–and much more!

Library eNews (also accessible at https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5952)

Inside This Issue:

Director’s Message
My Home Away From Home

Tell Us Your Story Winner
“The Alkek Library,” by Isabel Briana Torres

Student Voices
How Alkek and a Hike Helped Me Find My Way

Step Up Your Research
Using Library Resources to Sharpen Research Skills

Meet Our Staff
Kristine Toma, University Archivist

News from the North
Faculty: Place Reserve Items at the RRC Library

Collections Spotlight
Calling All Art Lovers!

At the Wittliff Collections
Wittliff Exhibit Highlights Classic Texas Films

Texas State University History
Glimpses of University History on Flickr

Copyright Corner
Using Images from the Internet

 

 

September Library eNews: ALKEK@25 Anniversary Issue

Library eNews: September 2015 edition

Here’s a preview of this month’s news:

Director’s Message 
Time to Celebrate!
Student Voices  
Chasing the Dream to Become a Registered Nurse
Step Up Your Research
New Staffing Models for Research Help
Collections Spotlight 
Then and Now: Collections at Alkek
Digitization Initiatives Growing at the Library
Discovering Government Resources
From Gov Docs to .Gov: Changes to Gov Info
Copyright Corner
Video Performance in the Classroom & on TRACS
Staff Feature
Jerry Weathers, Head Access Services Librarian
News from the North
Celebrating Years of Library Support
At the Wittliff Collections
Three New Exhibitions Open Now!
Texas State University History
Alkek Library Celebrates Its 25th Anniversary

Welcome to the first edition of the University Library’s electronic newsletter for the Texas State University community for the 2015-2016 academic year!  We hope that students, faculty, and staff will stay connected with the Library through our eNews features, including information about services, collections, and events at Alkek and the Round Rock Campus Library.

This month’s issue features many articles related to the Alkek Library’s 25th anniversary.  We especially encourage you to join in our celebration with a reenactment of the 1990 Book-It Brigade.  A “human chain” of students, faculty, staff, and community leaders will pass six books from Old Main (home of the original campus library) to the Alkek Library, linking the past with the present.  The first 400 participants will receive free commemorative t-shirts.  Refreshments will be provided at Alkek afterwards.

Where:  Meet at the scrolling marquee sign in the middle of the Quad – from there, people will form a human chain linking Old Main and the Alkek Library.

When:  Wednesday, September 23; human chain begins forming at 9:30 a.m.; book pass will start shortly after 10:00 a.m.

 

Boko Says, “March Library eNews!”

BokoReads2313

March Library eNews

Find these stories and more:

Renovation+Innovation=Inspiration
Library Resources for Every Learning Style
Finding Primary Sources for Your Research
Mobile Possibilities for Research and Teaching
BrowZine Scholarly Journals on Your Device
Liz King: Library Experience Librarian
The RRC Library—It’s Bigger Than You Think!
Books and Artifacts Bring the Southwest Alive
11,000+ Department of Defense Resources
Digitizing the Student Newspaper for Access
Plus “Calling all Faculty”! Try our new reading list builder, a pilot program

Find previous issues of Library eNews in our digital collections and on our website.

Fast Way to Find and Check Quotations @ the Alkek Library

Here’s the easiest way to find good quotes or check the accuracy and citation of a quote.

The internet isn’t always reliable and there are a lot of good quotes that were never actually said! Hint: if a citation isn’t included on a quote, then it’s a safe bet that the quote is apocryphal.

Go to our Collins Dictionary of Quotations (sign in required), and search by author or quotes on a topic (like freedom)

 

The Internet Wayback Machine Archives The Web

The Internet changes constantly. Ever wonder what happens to content that’s taken down?

A handful (but growing) number of organizations archive web content. A “picture” is taken every few days and stored.

The main Internet archive is called the Wayback Machine.

From The Economist:

The Wayback Machine’s inventor, Brewster Kahle, is an internet entrepreneur, philanthropist and computer whizz who helped design Mr Hillis’s ground-breaking Connection Machine in the 1980s. In 1996 he founded a non-profit organisation, the Internet Archive, to create a free internet library capable of storing a copy of every web page of every website ever to go online. The Wayback Machine allows users to view the library’s archived web pages as they appeared when published. Today the Internet Archive also includes texts, audio, moving images and software. At the last count, its collection contained more than 150 billion items.

Search The Wayback Machine Here

Even though we have the Wayback Machine, it is not a perfect solution and does not capture all of the web. Here’s a critique of our current storage methods of the web. 

Hidden Library Gems: The Long Essay Subject Encyclopedia

I’d like to introduce you to something I call the long essay subject encyclopedia. A subject encyclopedia is devoted to a particular discipline or even a specific idea. And the entries are quite different than you might think.

You guessed it, these are long essays (say, 2-10 pages) about narrow but important concepts written by experts. In other words, much longer than just a blurb or definition, but much shorter than an entire book.  It’s the equivalent of sitting down with the professor and asking them for an introduction/summation of a subject.

Examples might be theories of recidivism, an examination of the loose political structure of the Phoenician State, the history of the idea of regulatory capture, what regions of Spain sent emigrants to Mexico when and what professions these emigrants usually did, the effects of foreign direct investment on different economies, and the specific group survival strategies of different animal species.

This is where the library really shines over sources like Wikipedia.

These encyclopedias are located both in the reference section and in the regular stacks.  The ones in the regular stacks can be checked out.

Recommended for grad students, super users, or advanced undergrads.