1619 Project

Alkek Library has a new exhibit featuring the 1619 Project, a New York Times program by reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones. The New York Times describes the project as a “major initiative … observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery”. The publication includes essays, essays, poems, short fiction, and a photo essay. The 1619 Project speaks to the history and truth of 400 years of slavery in the United States that began in August 1619, when the first enslaved Africans were brought to North America. Slavery’s legacy has persisted throughout this country’s society, from education to the criminal justice system.

The exhibit features a copy of the original publication, provided by the Texas Student Government at a Diversity Week Lunch and Learn event. Publications by Dr. Ron Johnson and Dr. Dwonna Goldstone are also included.

The exhibit is in support of the new African American Studies minor that began offering courses Fall 2019. Please visit the exhibit on the 3rd floor of Alkek Library; the glass case is located in front of the Checkout Desk. https://guides.library.txstate.edu/AAST


#1619Project  @1619Project

Faculty: Get Print Journal Articles Delivered To You with FADS

Faculty Article Delivery Service (FADS)

Alkek Library now delivers electronic copies of articles from our print journal collection right to your desktop. This service, called Faculty Article Delivery Service or FADS, is available to faculty at either the San Marcos or Round Rock locations.

Here’s how to request an article through FADS:

Simply use the Interlibrary Loan system to request any print article, by filling out an online loan request using your ILLiad account. The interlibrary loan staff will take your request and either digitize the article on demand if we subscribe to the journal in print OR obtain the article via interlibrary loan (if we do not subscribe to the journal).
You will receive the article in a timely manner via your ILLiad account and can access the digital version on your desktop in your office or home– no more trips to the library to find and copy the article!
Please note that articles available in our Research Databases, accessible from the library homepage, are not included in the FADS or ILLiad service. The library licenses several thousand full-text e-journals, providing faculty with easy access to the journal literature at work and home or on the road.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Interlibrary Loan office at 245-4893 or via email.

New Alkek Library READ Poster with Dr. Erina Duganne

READ Poster - Erina Duganne_Chisel_draft 2

 

Announcing Alkek Library’s new READ poster for 2019. Dr. Erina Duganne’s testimonial won the spring Tell Us Your Story competition. Dr. Duganne’s testimonial is a compelling narrative about how the library is an integral part of her mentorship to her students and for her research. Read her full testimonial below:

“As an associate professor and area coordinator of the art history program in the School of Art and Design, my teaching and research depend on being able to easily access physical books and journals. One of my favorite activities at Alkek Library is to browse the stacks because you never know what resources you will discover while looking for something else. I teach my students the importance of using the online search catalog as a jumping-off point towards exploration within the stacks. I encourage students to pull many books and journals off the shelves and to spend as much or as little time with them as they need. I also urge them to think about these resources not just for their textual contents but also their material specificity. This assignment comes from my own experiences browsing books in Alkek Library and finding something unexpectedly which would go on to make a major impact on my thinking about a subject. Books are the building blocks of art historical research. We are exceedingly fortunate to have Alkek Library as a resource for our teaching and research.”

 

Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

Your Voice: Dr. Erina Duganne

Photo of Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

As an associate professor and area coordinator of the art history program in the School of Art and Design, my teaching and research depend on being able to easily access physical books and journals. One of my favorite activities at Alkek Library is to browse the stacks because you never know what resources you will discover while looking for something else. I teach my students the importance of using the online search catalogue as a jumping off point towards exploration within the stacks. I encourage students to pull many books and journals off the shelves and to spend as much or as little time with them as they need. I also urge them to think about these resources not just for their textual contents but also their material specificity. This assignment comes from my own experiences browsing books in Alkek Library and finding something unexpectedly which would go on to make a major impact on my thinking about a subject. Books are at the building blocks of art historical research. We are exceedingly fortunate to have Alkek Library as a resource for our teaching and research. —  Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

RefWorks Webinar: Organize and Manage your citations!

Refworks2
If you’ve putting off organizing all those citations and articles you’ve gathered throughout the year, join us for some Summer Cleaning! Learn how to use RefWorks to organize, manage, preserve, and share your research and citations.

Signup for the Wednesday June 26th Webinar here: https://signup.txstate.edu/sessions/5130-refworks

Featured Author: Haruki Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle)

Our books here.

Background from this article

Murakami grew up, mostly, in the suburbs surrounding Kobe, an international port defined by the din of many languages. As a teenager, he immersed himself in American culture, especially hard-boiled detective novels and jazz. He internalized their attitude of cool rebellion, and in his early 20s, instead of joining the ranks of a large corporation, Murakami grew out his hair and his beard, married against his parents’ wishes, took out a loan and opened a jazz club in Tokyo called Peter Cat. He spent nearly 10 years absorbed in the day-to-day operations of the club: sweeping up, listening to music, making sandwiches and mixing drinks deep into the night.

His career as a writer began in classic Murakami style: out of nowhere, in the most ordinary possible setting, a mystical truth suddenly descended upon him and changed his life forever. Murakami, age 29, was sitting in the outfield at his local baseball stadium, drinking a beer, when a batter — an American transplant named Dave Hilton — hit a double. It was a normal-/enough play, but as the ball flew through the air, an epiphany struck Murakami. He realized, suddenly, that he could write a novel. He had never felt a serious desire to do so before, but now it was overwhelming. And so he did: after the game, he went to a bookstore, bought a pen and some paper and over the next couple of months produced ”Hear the Wind Sing,” a slim, elliptical tale of a nameless 21-year-old narrator, his friend called the Rat and a four-fingered woman. Nothing much happens, but the Murakami voice is there from the start: a strange broth of ennui and exoticism.

The Internet Wayback Machine Archives The Web

The Internet changes constantly. Ever wonder what happens to content that’s taken down?

A handful (but growing) number of organizations archive web content. A “picture” is taken every few days and stored.

The main Internet archive is called the Wayback Machine.

From The Economist:

The Wayback Machine’s inventor, Brewster Kahle, is an internet entrepreneur, philanthropist and computer whizz who helped design Mr Hillis’s ground-breaking Connection Machine in the 1980s. In 1996 he founded a non-profit organisation, the Internet Archive, to create a free internet library capable of storing a copy of every web page of every website ever to go online. The Wayback Machine allows users to view the library’s archived web pages as they appeared when published. Today the Internet Archive also includes texts, audio, moving images and software. At the last count, its collection contained more than 150 billion items.

Search The Wayback Machine Here

Even though we have the Wayback Machine, it is not a perfect solution and does not capture all of the web. Here’s a critique of our current storage methods of the web. 

Your Voice: HeeJae Chung

HeeJae Chung's testimonial and photo

As a doctoral student and a student member of the library advisory board, I come to the Alkek for academic resources, professional development workshops, and personal projects. I did not know all the various services a school library could offer to the campus community. Last year, I was working on a personal project that I was planning to gift it as a present to my husband as it would be our first Christmas together in Texas. I wanted to convert all the VHS tapes that contained videos of him and his mother who passed away. I needed a VHS player to do this, but it would have cost me around $500 to make this happen through a service. I came to the Alkek and discovered that I could check out a VHS player, so that’s what I did! Thanks to the Alkek electronic equipment check out services, I was able to gift one of the most meaningful gifts I could ever give to my husband.

HeeJae Chung, Adult, Professional, and Community Education Ph.D. student, a Doctoral Research Assistant at the CLAS Department