Alkek Little Free Library

LittleFreeLibraryIntroducing the Alkek Little Free Library!

Located on Thorpe & Warden Lanes in San Marcos, it is a tiny library created to encourage the community to share, exchange, and read books. It is on Texas State property, Bldg. #967 at 1401 Thorpe Lane.

A team of Alkek Library staffers have launched a Texas State community service project to promote literacy to our San Marcos community through the Little Free Library program. The team, which started work in 2015, has included Lisa Ancelet, Gaye Wood, Tricia Boucher, Terry Hernandez, Roberto Gutierrez, Liz Sisemore, Emily Segoria, Megan Ballengee, Gina Watts, and Hithia Davis, the chair. The little wooden library was made by a volunteer from the community, Jason Pfanenstiel.

Little Free Library is a nonprofit organization that inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighborhood book exchanges around the world. Through Little Free Libraries, millions of books are exchanged each year, profoundly increasing access to books for readers of all ages and backgrounds.

As a major employer and organizational citizen of the San Marcos community, Texas State’s University Libraries feels a responsibility to share its Bobcat pride and spread the joy and educational benefits of reading beyond our campus.

The front bill poster proudly displays the Texas State logo and encourages people to enjoy a book and then return it and enjoy another. The idea is to get the community to share and read books in this free community exchange. The box was originally stocked with books donated by library staff.

A second box is planned to be located on property owned by the De La Cruz Family, who have partnered in this effort, on the corner of FM 1978 and Redwood Rd. later this year

Library staff used GIS Technology and expertise to identify locations within the community that are not in close proximity to public libraries, not in flood areas, and where the socio-economic and literacy data indicated a strong need for access to books.

The team is currently working with campus student organizations to maintain the boxes and is making plans to promote and expand the program.

Faculty: Get Print Journal Articles Delivered To You with FADS

Faculty Article Delivery Service (FADS)

Alkek Library now delivers electronic copies of articles from our print journal collection right to your desktop. This service, called Faculty Article Delivery Service or FADS, is available to faculty at either the San Marcos or Round Rock locations.

Here’s how to request an article through FADS:

Simply use the Interlibrary Loan system to request any print article, by filling out an online loan request using your ILLiad account. The interlibrary loan staff will take your request and either digitize the article on demand if we subscribe to the journal in print OR obtain the article via interlibrary loan (if we do not subscribe to the journal).
You will receive the article in a timely manner via your ILLiad account and can access the digital version on your desktop in your office or home– no more trips to the library to find and copy the article!
Please note that articles available in our Research Databases, accessible from the library homepage, are not included in the FADS or ILLiad service. The library licenses several thousand full-text e-journals, providing faculty with easy access to the journal literature at work and home or on the road.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Interlibrary Loan office at 245-4893 or via email.

Books on Interpreting Dreams

There’s an actual science to interpreting your dreams – how to relate your dream to your life, what your dreams really mean, and different versions of yourself or others in the dream (hidden parts of your personality or other people may appear as different characters in your dream).

Reading this material will definitely help you decode what you are dreaming about.

Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation Of Dreams is here.

You can also browse other books about dream Interpretation and meaning here.

Researching Justice: Primary Resources at the Alkek Library Exhibit

JANUARY 26 – MAY 30
1ST FLOOR EXHIBIT CASES

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“View of Mount Carmel from sniper’s nest,” ca March 1993, photographer unknown. Photographs, Box 41, Folder 11. Dick J. Reavis Papers, The Wittliff Collections, Texas State University.

The Waco Siege occurred in February-April of 1993, when federal agents initiated a siege after a failed raid on the Branch Davidian compound. In the end, four federal agents and 82 civilians were killed. The Alkek Library holds many primary resources on the Waco Siege, in The Wittliff Collections archives and in Government Documents. The exhibit provides background on the events, as well as direction on how to learn more, about this event and other government actions, using library resources. Ashes of Waco is a digital collection from The Wittliff.

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“Aerial photos of Mount Carmel, April 19, 1993” (Andrade vs. Chojnacki, FLIR Evidence, ca 2000 Aerial photos of Mount Carmel on April 19, 1993, before and after fire starts, used as evidence in Adrade vs. Chojnacki civil court case. Trial document, Box 53, Folder 6. Dick J. Reavis Papers, The Wittliff Collections, Texas State University.

The miniseries “Waco” premieres Wednesday, Jan 28, and uses archival footage from The Wittliff Collections. And, the first of several documentary film projects for the 25th anniversary of the Waco Siege will be airing on the A&E network January 28-29. The 4-hour, two-part documentary special, “Waco: Madman or Messiah,” uses about 5 minutes of video material from across the Dick Reavis / Ashes of Waco collection.

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM, Alkek Library Film Talks Series will host a screening of the documentary Oklahoma City. The documentary traces the events–including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco–that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history.

For more information, contact Government Documents Librarian Rory Elliott at re19@txstate.edu, or Wittliff Archivist Lauren Goodley at l_g138@txstate.edu.

Staff Picks: Patricia Highsmith (The Talented Mr. Ripley)

Patricia Highsmith is best known for her crime novels The Talented Mr. Ripley and Strangers On A Train – both made into classic films. But she also wrote a lot of other novels and short stories that feature such disparate subjects as animals taking revenge on cruel people, giant snails, and icy and claustrophobic tales of daily life.

In fact, it was the giant snails that got me as a kid. A professor goes in search of legendary giants snails on a Pacific Island and, well, he does find them.

There’s also the dinner party at which the host’s cat brings in a finger, a mysterious furry thing that lives in the birdhouse that may or may not have gotten into the narrator’s house and lots more stories guaranteed to put a chill in your heart.

All Highsmith books here..

Staff Picks: Thomas Pynchon (Inherent Vice)

All Thomas Pynchon books here

From Literature Resource Center 

Pynchon is widely regarded as one of the most eminent literary stylists in contemporary American fiction. His novels, often described as labyrinthine or encyclopedic in scope, are characterized by an aura of great mystery and reveal a knowledge of many disciplines in the natural and social sciences. Pynchon’s use of sophisticated ideas is balanced by his verbal playfulness with such elements as black humor, outlandish puns, slapstick, running gags, parody, and ridiculous names. Through this blend of serious themes and comic invention and combination of documented fact and imaginative fantasy, Pynchon paradoxically affirms and denies the notion that mundane reality may possess hidden meaning. Living amidst the chaos of modern existence that is mirrored in the fragmented structures of his novels, Pynchon’s protagonists typically undertake vague yet elaborate quests to discover their identities and to find meaning and order in their lives. While Pynchon’s novels have often been faulted as labored or incomprehensible, all have provoked ongoing scholarly debate and earned widespread popularity among young readers.

Coming Soon:

 

 

Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest Winner! – Update

ValeriaSanmiguelTattooWinnerIn October, the library hosted a tattoo design competition for students to create original tattoos designed with the library in mind. After the designs were received, the library polled the campus via social media and over 500 votes were received! After all the votes were tallied, the winner of the Fall 2017 Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest was Valeria Sanmiguel with her tattoo design incorporating Alkek, Old Main, Gaillardia flowers, and the night sky. In congratulations, Valeria and her design have been commemorated in the library’s permanent collection. Stop by the circulation desk to pick up a sticker with the winning tattoo!

TravisandValeriaAlkekTattooUPDATE: Valeria Sanmiguel’s winning Alkek Library Tattoo design inspired Travis Wright to get a tattoo of Alkek. Travis said, “I always wanted a library tattoo, so when I found out Alkek was getting an official design I thought, ‘that settles it.’ I had always loved libraries in general, but this one has been especially meaningful to me since the help I’ve gotten here contributed to my first publication.” Travis is a 2018 Texas State Philosophy graduate. The University Star published an article about the Alkek Lbirary Tattoo Design contest, the winner, and Travis’ Alkek tattoo.

tattoo design - final versionFor any questions about the Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest please contact Megan Ballengee

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