Finals Events at Alkek!

Alkek Library will be open 24 hours each day before and during finals, starting at 7 a.m. on Monday, May 1 until midnight on Friday, May 5. Saturday, May 6 we’re open from 10 a.m. to  1 a.m., and then we resume continuous hours from 10 a.m. Sunday, May 7 until we close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 10.

ShinerFinals are stressful, so starting Wednesday, May 3, the main floor of the library will have all sorts of ways to take study breaks. Stop by the Research & Information Desk to pick up a piece of candy, stress-relief bubble wrap, or a pencil for your scantron. Also, we’ll have 3D Doodle Pens and LEGO® available near the Media Corner, where we’ll be showing cartoons.

makerdayWe’ll also have some special events in the Open Theater on the main floor. Therapy dogs are returning (yay!), and will be here from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, May 2 and Wednesday, May 3. Maker Day will be on Tuesday, May 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.– all supplies are provided, so stop in and relax while making something to take home.

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Zev

The point is, take a breather! And if you’re stuck and have a last-minute research question, chat with us using Ask-A-Librarian, or email, call, or just stop by the Research & Information Desk – we’re happy to help.

Happy finals, everyone!

Books on Interpreting Dreams

There’s an actual science to interpreting your dreams – how to relate your dream to your life, what your dreams really mean, and different versions of yourself or others in the dream (hidden parts of your personality or other people may appear as different characters in your dream).

Reading this material will definitely help you decode what you are dreaming about.

Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation Of Dreams is here.

You can also browse other books about dream Interpretation and meaning here.

Discover Robert Aickman, Suspense Writer

All Robert Aickman books here.

Robert Aickman was a master of the “strange story.” His style is related to MR James and the ghost stories of Henry James, but Aickman has his own voice. Enigma, vibe and alienation are some of his hallmarks.

Literature Resource Center sums up one Aickman story:

In “The Inner Room,” collected in Sub Rosa (1968), a woman narrates the story of an incident from her early childhood in a struggling family that later splits apart. She receives as a birthday gift an enormous dollhouse that contains a mysteriously inaccessible inner room. Later in life, she visits what is apparently the actual house on which the dollhouse was modeled and comes close to discovering a nameless horror in the inner room, which signifies the hidden life of dream–or rather dream as reality, which creates emotional peril when repressed.

Featured Author: Frank Luntz (Words That Work)

What Americans Really Want 
Words That Work 

Frank Luntz is a political consultant who pioneered studying how people react to words – instead of actions. He was a master at calculating how people perceive a problem and packaging policies – both corporate and political -that met those expectations.  You didn’t have to change your actual policy!

He’s also very good at finding the gulf between people’s stated values and their actual values and exploiting that.

We have two of his books here.  Interesting guy and a must read for marketers.

Featured Author: Haruki Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle)

Our books here.

Background from this article

Murakami grew up, mostly, in the suburbs surrounding Kobe, an international port defined by the din of many languages. As a teenager, he immersed himself in American culture, especially hard-boiled detective novels and jazz. He internalized their attitude of cool rebellion, and in his early 20s, instead of joining the ranks of a large corporation, Murakami grew out his hair and his beard, married against his parents’ wishes, took out a loan and opened a jazz club in Tokyo called Peter Cat. He spent nearly 10 years absorbed in the day-to-day operations of the club: sweeping up, listening to music, making sandwiches and mixing drinks deep into the night.

His career as a writer began in classic Murakami style: out of nowhere, in the most ordinary possible setting, a mystical truth suddenly descended upon him and changed his life forever. Murakami, age 29, was sitting in the outfield at his local baseball stadium, drinking a beer, when a batter — an American transplant named Dave Hilton — hit a double. It was a normal-/enough play, but as the ball flew through the air, an epiphany struck Murakami. He realized, suddenly, that he could write a novel. He had never felt a serious desire to do so before, but now it was overwhelming. And so he did: after the game, he went to a bookstore, bought a pen and some paper and over the next couple of months produced ”Hear the Wind Sing,” a slim, elliptical tale of a nameless 21-year-old narrator, his friend called the Rat and a four-fingered woman. Nothing much happens, but the Murakami voice is there from the start: a strange broth of ennui and exoticism.