Books on Interpreting Dreams

There’s an actual science to interpreting your dreams – how to relate your dream to your life, what your dreams really mean, and different versions of yourself or others in the dream (hidden parts of your personality or other people may appear as different characters in your dream).

Reading this material will definitely help you decode what you are dreaming about.

Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation Of Dreams is here.

You can also browse other books about dream Interpretation and meaning here.

Researching Justice: Primary Resources at the Alkek Library Exhibit

JANUARY 26 – MAY 30
1ST FLOOR EXHIBIT CASES

Floor1Exhibit-ImageBorder

“View of Mount Carmel from sniper’s nest,” ca March 1993, photographer unknown. Photographs, Box 41, Folder 11. Dick J. Reavis Papers, The Wittliff Collections, Texas State University.

The Waco Siege occurred in February-April of 1993, when federal agents initiated a siege after a failed raid on the Branch Davidian compound. In the end, four federal agents and 82 civilians were killed. The Alkek Library holds many primary resources on the Waco Siege, in The Wittliff Collections archives and in Government Documents. The exhibit provides background on the events, as well as direction on how to learn more, about this event and other government actions, using library resources. Ashes of Waco is a digital collection from The Wittliff.

aerial1

“Aerial photos of Mount Carmel, April 19, 1993” (Andrade vs. Chojnacki, FLIR Evidence, ca 2000 Aerial photos of Mount Carmel on April 19, 1993, before and after fire starts, used as evidence in Adrade vs. Chojnacki civil court case. Trial document, Box 53, Folder 6. Dick J. Reavis Papers, The Wittliff Collections, Texas State University.

The miniseries “Waco” premieres Wednesday, Jan 28, and uses archival footage from The Wittliff Collections. And, the first of several documentary film projects for the 25th anniversary of the Waco Siege will be airing on the A&E network January 28-29. The 4-hour, two-part documentary special, “Waco: Madman or Messiah,” uses about 5 minutes of video material from across the Dick Reavis / Ashes of Waco collection.

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM, Alkek Library Film Talks Series will host a screening of the documentary Oklahoma City. The documentary traces the events–including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco–that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history.

For more information, contact Government Documents Librarian Rory Elliott at re19@txstate.edu, or Wittliff Archivist Lauren Goodley at l_g138@txstate.edu.

Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest Winner! – Update

ValeriaSanmiguelTattooWinnerIn October, the library hosted a tattoo design competition for students to create original tattoos designed with the library in mind. After the designs were received, the library polled the campus via social media and over 500 votes were received! After all the votes were tallied, the winner of the Fall 2017 Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest was Valeria Sanmiguel with her tattoo design incorporating Alkek, Old Main, Gaillardia flowers, and the night sky. In congratulations, Valeria and her design have been commemorated in the library’s permanent collection. Stop by the circulation desk to pick up a sticker with the winning tattoo!

TravisandValeriaAlkekTattooUPDATE: Valeria Sanmiguel’s winning Alkek Library Tattoo design inspired Travis Wright to get a tattoo of Alkek. Travis said, “I always wanted a library tattoo, so when I found out Alkek was getting an official design I thought, ‘that settles it.’ I had always loved libraries in general, but this one has been especially meaningful to me since the help I’ve gotten here contributed to my first publication.” Travis is a 2018 Texas State Philosophy graduate. The University Star published an article about the Alkek Lbirary Tattoo Design contest, the winner, and Travis’ Alkek tattoo.

tattoo design - final versionFor any questions about the Alkek Library Tattoo Design Contest please contact Megan Ballengee

TattooWinnerGoldSeal

 

 

 

 

Featured Author: Karel Capek (Rossum’s Universal Robots)

All Karel Capek books here.

From Literary Reference Center

Karel Čapek is remembered today for his popularization of the word “robot,” actually first used by his brother Josef in his short story “Opilec” (1917) and used by Karel in R.U.R.: Rossum’s Universal Robots, which was first produced in Prague in January, 1921. The word is from the Czech robota, meaning compulsory service or work. Popularizing this word, however, was certainly not Čapek’s most notable professional achievement. A deeply philosophical man, professionally trained as a philosopher, Čapek was the first Czech writer to attract a broad international audience for his works, particularly for his expressionist drama, which has been translated into many languages and has been performed all over the world.

A versatile intellectual, Čapek, during his years on the staff of Lidové noviny, the most influential Czech newspaper, demonstrated by the excellence of his writing that journalism can be an art. He wrote on a broad range of subjects, from Persian rugs to gardening to drama and art. Čapek was also an incisive political thinker who wrote stirring political essays, but his political sentiments achieve a more universal expression in his plays and novels, particularly in such plays as R.U.R., The Insect Play, and Power and Glory and in the novels of his trilogy comprising Hordubal, Meteor, and An Ordinary Life. His novel most familiar to English-speaking audiences is The War with the Newts, which builds directly on much of the social criticism found in R.U.R. and in The Insect Play and which presents one of the earliest direct literary attacks on Hitler. His trilogy has attracted considerable interest for its manner of dealing with the infinite diversity of the human personality.

Featured Author: Haruki Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle)

Our books here.

Background from this article

Murakami grew up, mostly, in the suburbs surrounding Kobe, an international port defined by the din of many languages. As a teenager, he immersed himself in American culture, especially hard-boiled detective novels and jazz. He internalized their attitude of cool rebellion, and in his early 20s, instead of joining the ranks of a large corporation, Murakami grew out his hair and his beard, married against his parents’ wishes, took out a loan and opened a jazz club in Tokyo called Peter Cat. He spent nearly 10 years absorbed in the day-to-day operations of the club: sweeping up, listening to music, making sandwiches and mixing drinks deep into the night.

His career as a writer began in classic Murakami style: out of nowhere, in the most ordinary possible setting, a mystical truth suddenly descended upon him and changed his life forever. Murakami, age 29, was sitting in the outfield at his local baseball stadium, drinking a beer, when a batter — an American transplant named Dave Hilton — hit a double. It was a normal-/enough play, but as the ball flew through the air, an epiphany struck Murakami. He realized, suddenly, that he could write a novel. He had never felt a serious desire to do so before, but now it was overwhelming. And so he did: after the game, he went to a bookstore, bought a pen and some paper and over the next couple of months produced ”Hear the Wind Sing,” a slim, elliptical tale of a nameless 21-year-old narrator, his friend called the Rat and a four-fingered woman. Nothing much happens, but the Murakami voice is there from the start: a strange broth of ennui and exoticism.

Featured Author: Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club)

All Chuck Palahniuk books here.

Chuck Palahniuk is best known as the author of Fight Club, the classic novel that was also made into a classic film. The novel opens with the memorable line “Tyler gets me a job as a waiter, after that Tyler’s bushmen got into my mouth and saying, the first step to eternal life is you have to die.”

From there on we learn the tale of a milquetoastish individual who discovers his Nietzschean will to power via the machinations of the mysterious Tyler Durden. The first rule of Fight Club is not to talk about Fight Club.

The author also went on to write several equally unusual books. Link above.

Texas State University’s Archives and Research Center Now Open

ARCstaffFeatureatThe Archives and Research Center (ARC) at the  Science, Technology and Advanced Research(STAR) Park Research campus in San Marcos is now open. The ARC is the third library facility operated by the University Libraries joining the prominent Albert B. Alkek Library, located in the heart of the San Marcos campus, and the growing Round Rock Campus Library

The ARC is a state-of-the art archive library that will preserve decades of university treasures and library resources, collections and research materials. Its climate-controlled environment with cold temperatures and low humidity will prolong the life of these unique assets keeping them available for exploration and discovery, while supporting the growth of the Alkek Library and Texas State. The new library facility will be open to the public and will include a reading room to allow students, faculty, staff and researchers to review and interact with materials on site. Daily transportation of materials checked out from the ARC to the Alkek Library will make accessing materials quick and easy so patrons on the San Marcos campus will not need to drive to STAR Park to retrieve desired items.

The 14,000 square-foot ARC features a high-density shelving model that rises 35 feet high, contains more than six miles of shelving space and is environmentally controlled at 50°F with 30 percent relative humidity for ideal preservation of most materials. The initially identified materials that will move to the ARC over the next two years will include more than 600,000 library items and 3,000 linear feet of archival and Wittliff Collections materials.

ARCoutsideWith the new ARC facility, Texas State joins other major research universities like Harvard, Stanford, Rice, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M and many others who have built similar high-density, climate-controlled storage facilities to house and preserve their valuable collections and research materials.

Unique to the Texas State facility, is a secondary climate-controlled environment that will preserve art and artifacts that need a slightly higher temperature and humidity level. Items that need cooler temperatures, but could become brittle in the extreme cold and dry environment like oil paintings and wooden artifacts will be stored in the Art and Artifacts room at 68°F and 40 percent relative humidity.

The opening of the ARC also advances planned improvements to the Alkek Library that will meet the needs of today’s digitally focused students. The migration of seldom-circulated, but valuable resources from the Alkek to the ARC will free up space for the addition of modern, technology-rich learning commons features that will make the Alkek a showcase information and research facility.

Planned additions to the Alkek support research, innovation and student success and include: a virtual reality and makerspace center, 3D technologies, video presentation studios and practice labs, a digital media center, a GIS/data research hub, technology-centric group study and collaboration spaces, flexible model classrooms with robust technology, and a café.

Even as the ARC makes way for the Alkek to evolve into a more modern library facility, generous space will continue to be dedicated to new and in-demand book stacks, resource materials and quiet independent study spaces so that students and faculty across all disciplines can find what they need and the space to suit their individual preferences within the walls of the Alkek Library.

Additional space on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library will also make way for the expansion of the prestigious Wittliff Collections with growing assets that now include the Southwestern Writers Collection, the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection, the Lonesome Dove Collection and major papers of such notable authors as Cormac McCarthy, Sam Shepard and Sandra Cisneros. The collection also boasts the largest repository of modern and contemporary Mexican photography in the U.S. and is one of the university’s most valuable research resources.

Submitted by Debbie Pitts, University Libraries Marketing and Promotions Coordinator

Olga Gerhart’s Library Testimonial

OlgaGerhartTestimonial“Since arriving at the Texas State University Philosophy Department two years ago, the library has been an incredible resource.  In terms of my teaching, librarians have provided customized learning sessions for both my lower- and upper-level classes, and I frequently use the “Ask a Librarian” feature to find a fact or statistic before I go into lecture.  I also have been able to order books that I have adopted in classes so that I can place them on Reserve for the students.  And if the library does not have an article I would like to assign my students to read, the Copyright Officer purchases access to it.  In terms of my research, interlibrary loan has been invaluable.  Moreover, after I have written a piece, the Copyright Officer will not only help me determine what copyright permissions need to be obtained, the Officer will actually do the work to get those permissions.  Finally, in terms of character, the librarians with whom I have worked have always been friendly, knowledgeable, and über competent.”

— Olga Gerhart, Philosophy Faculty