Literary Passings: Brian Aldiss, Science Fiction Master

All Brian Aldiss library books here.

From the Washington Post:

Brian Aldiss, a British science-fiction writer whose inventive tales of climate change, alien civilization and the loneliness of robots — including a five-page magazine story that formed the basis of Steven Spielberg’s movie “A.I.” — helped elevate a genre many critics had long dismissed as mass-market pulp, died Aug. 19 at his home in Oxford, one day after turning 92.

A daughter, Wendy Aldiss, said he had a stroke in 2016 and had a pacemaker in his heart — “which he loved, because it made him part robot.”

Mr. Aldiss was part of sci-fi’s 1960s New Wave period, when writers such as Arthur C. Clarke (“2001: A Space Odyssey”) and J.G. Ballard (“The Wind From Nowhere”) wrote books that featured politically charged themes and experimental literary techniques.

Texas State University’s Archives and Research Center Now Open

ARCstaffFeatureatThe Archives and Research Center (ARC) at the  Science, Technology and Advanced Research(STAR) Park Research campus in San Marcos is now open. The ARC is the third library facility operated by the University Libraries joining the prominent Albert B. Alkek Library, located in the heart of the San Marcos campus, and the growing Round Rock Campus Library

The ARC is a state-of-the art archive library that will preserve decades of university treasures and library resources, collections and research materials. Its climate-controlled environment with cold temperatures and low humidity will prolong the life of these unique assets keeping them available for exploration and discovery, while supporting the growth of the Alkek Library and Texas State. The new library facility will be open to the public and will include a reading room to allow students, faculty, staff and researchers to review and interact with materials on site. Daily transportation of materials checked out from the ARC to the Alkek Library will make accessing materials quick and easy so patrons on the San Marcos campus will not need to drive to STAR Park to retrieve desired items.

The 14,000 square-foot ARC features a high-density shelving model that rises 35 feet high, contains more than six miles of shelving space and is environmentally controlled at 50°F with 30 percent relative humidity for ideal preservation of most materials. The initially identified materials that will move to the ARC over the next two years will include more than 600,000 library items and 3,000 linear feet of archival and Wittliff Collections materials.

ARCoutsideWith the new ARC facility, Texas State joins other major research universities like Harvard, Stanford, Rice, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M and many others who have built similar high-density, climate-controlled storage facilities to house and preserve their valuable collections and research materials.

Unique to the Texas State facility, is a secondary climate-controlled environment that will preserve art and artifacts that need a slightly higher temperature and humidity level. Items that need cooler temperatures, but could become brittle in the extreme cold and dry environment like oil paintings and wooden artifacts will be stored in the Art and Artifacts room at 68°F and 40 percent relative humidity.

The opening of the ARC also advances planned improvements to the Alkek Library that will meet the needs of today’s digitally focused students. The migration of seldom-circulated, but valuable resources from the Alkek to the ARC will free up space for the addition of modern, technology-rich learning commons features that will make the Alkek a showcase information and research facility.

Planned additions to the Alkek support research, innovation and student success and include: a virtual reality and makerspace center, 3D technologies, video presentation studios and practice labs, a digital media center, a GIS/data research hub, technology-centric group study and collaboration spaces, flexible model classrooms with robust technology, and a café.

Even as the ARC makes way for the Alkek to evolve into a more modern library facility, generous space will continue to be dedicated to new and in-demand book stacks, resource materials and quiet independent study spaces so that students and faculty across all disciplines can find what they need and the space to suit their individual preferences within the walls of the Alkek Library.

Additional space on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library will also make way for the expansion of the prestigious Wittliff Collections with growing assets that now include the Southwestern Writers Collection, the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection, the Lonesome Dove Collection and major papers of such notable authors as Cormac McCarthy, Sam Shepard and Sandra Cisneros. The collection also boasts the largest repository of modern and contemporary Mexican photography in the U.S. and is one of the university’s most valuable research resources.

Submitted by Debbie Pitts, University Libraries Marketing and Promotions Coordinator

Olga Gerhart’s Library Testimonial

OlgaGerhartTestimonial“Since arriving at the Texas State University Philosophy Department two years ago, the library has been an incredible resource.  In terms of my teaching, librarians have provided customized learning sessions for both my lower- and upper-level classes, and I frequently use the “Ask a Librarian” feature to find a fact or statistic before I go into lecture.  I also have been able to order books that I have adopted in classes so that I can place them on Reserve for the students.  And if the library does not have an article I would like to assign my students to read, the Copyright Officer purchases access to it.  In terms of my research, interlibrary loan has been invaluable.  Moreover, after I have written a piece, the Copyright Officer will not only help me determine what copyright permissions need to be obtained, the Officer will actually do the work to get those permissions.  Finally, in terms of character, the librarians with whom I have worked have always been friendly, knowledgeable, and über competent.”

— Olga Gerhart, Philosophy Faculty

We Have Screenplays

Find all screenplays here.

Did you know that we have screenplays at the Alkek Library? Technically, they are housed at the Southwest Writers, Wittliff Collections Reading Room, on the seventh floor of the library.

While the screenplays cannot leave the building, stop by and spend a few minutes reading everything from major Hollywood productions to critically acclaimed small films.

FabJob Books Help You Start Your Career Or Business

All FabJob books here.

FabJob books are well-written, easy-to-read guides to how to get a job or start a business in your chosen field. There are books on becoming a coffee shop owner, a fashion designer, a secondhand close retailer and more. Covers everything from the credentials you might need, to capital requirements and the nuts and bolts of running that business.

Highly recommended.

How to Search Using Parentheses – As In: (Emily or Charlotte) Bronte

What if there are two are more common or related words and you want to include both of them in your search?  You’ll use parentheses – it works like an algebraic equation.

You enter your search into the database like so:

Example (blue or harvest) moon. You’ll get results that include blue and moon and harvest and moon.

(Soviet or Russia) “Cold War”

You’ll get results that include Soviet and “Cold War” AND Russia and “Cold War.”

If you have been doing searches like blue or harvest moon, you’ll get results back that feature only the word blue together with results that mix harvest and moon. No blue moon exactly, just blue….skies, bells, tooth, etc…

The parentheses make sure (those words go together.)

How To Read A Call Number and Find a Book

callnumCall numbers are those letters and numbers written on a piece of paper taped to the spine of the book. There are just codes for different subjects – psychology, criminal justice, poetry, and so on.

Normally, you’d be doing a search in the catalog and you’ll see this.

bigca

The call number is in the middle of the record.  It also tells you what floor to go to.

Once you get to the floor, each aisle tells you what numbers are on that aisle. Just like a grocery store.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Printing @ Alkek

We now have BYOD printing (bring your own device).

Here’s how it works.

EMAIL PRINTING

Using your Texas State e-mail account, send an email to one of these addresses (duplex-alk@txstate.edu or letter-alk@txstate.edu (duplex is for double-sided print jobs, letter is for single- sided print jobs).

Attach any documents would like to print to the email.  The body of your email also show up as a print job if you want to print that way.

Go to a print release station to release your print jobs.  There are print release stations available on every floor of Alkek library.

UPLOAD PRINTING:

Navigate to http://printeron.its.txstate.edu/

Click of the print button.  Login with your Texas State netID and password.  Expand all of the categories and select a printer you want to print two.  Use duplex for two-sided print jobs and letter for single-sided print jobs.  Browse for an upload the document you want to print.  Click continue once the document is selected for upload.  Click continue once more after adjusting page sizes.  Wait for the job to upload.  Once the page displays complete go to a print release station to release your job.

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