Literary Passings: Toni Morrison (Beloved)

Our Toni Morrison holdings here.

From this obituary:

Toni Morrison, who has died aged 88, was the only African American writer and one of the few women to have received the Nobel prize for literature. The announcement of her 1993 award cited her as a writer “who, in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import, gives life to an essential aspect of American reality”. In her acceptance speech Morrison emphasized the importance of language “partly as a system, partly as a living thing over which one has control, but mostly as an agency – as an act with consequences.”

She expressed her own credo, and indicated the core preoccupations of her fiction, in the fable at the heart of her speech, where she imagines young people telling an old black woman: “Narrative is radical, creating us at the very moment it is being created … For our sakes and yours forget your name in the street; tell us what the world has been to you in the dark places and in the light … Tell us what it is to be a woman so that we may know what it is to be a man. What moves at the margin. What it is to have no home in this place. To be set adrift from the one you knew. What it is to live at the edge of towns that cannot bear your company.”

Dressing For A Job Interview

Do you know how to mix and match different patterns?  If your jacket has a wide check pattern and you want to wear a tie with dots, what is the correct call? Can you wear a jacket with a check pattern with a tie with a check pattern?

Check out this timeless advice from men’s clothing legend Alan Flusser.

(This book is located in the oversized section on floor 6.)

Enlighten us, Mr. Flusser:

If using different patterns in jacket and tie, keep the size close.
If same pattern in jacket and tie, vary size of pattern.

Here are some good titles for women:

Examples: What to Wear, Where: The How-To Handbook for any Style Situation

Work It: Visual Therapy’s Guide to Your Ultimate Career Wardrobe.

FabJob Books Help You Start Your Career Or Business

All FabJob books here.

FabJob books are well-written, easy-to-read guides to how to get a job or start a business in your chosen field. There are books on becoming a coffee shop owner, a fashion designer, a secondhand close retailer and more. Covers everything from the credentials you might need, to capital requirements and the nuts and bolts of running that business.

Highly recommended.

Your Voice: Dr. Erina Duganne

Photo of Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

As an associate professor and area coordinator of the art history program in the School of Art and Design, my teaching and research depend on being able to easily access physical books and journals. One of my favorite activities at Alkek Library is to browse the stacks because you never know what resources you will discover while looking for something else. I teach my students the importance of using the online search catalogue as a jumping off point towards exploration within the stacks. I encourage students to pull many books and journals off the shelves and to spend as much or as little time with them as they need. I also urge them to think about these resources not just for their textual contents but also their material specificity. This assignment comes from my own experiences browsing books in Alkek Library and finding something unexpectedly which would go on to make a major impact on my thinking about a subject. Books are at the building blocks of art historical research. We are exceedingly fortunate to have Alkek Library as a resource for our teaching and research. —  Dr. Erina Duganne, Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Art History, School of Art & Design

Staff Picks: Ralph Steadman, Illustrator of Hunter Thompson (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas)

All Steadman books here.

If you’ve ever read Hunter Thompson (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Hell’s Angels) you’re probably aware of the cover art that captures Thompson’s fevered prose perfectly. I’ll let Ralph Steadman himself in the following article explain the synthesis:

“When I arrived at something I wanted to draw. I’d stop reading and draw it right then. It’s like arriving at a cafe or a truck stop: You don’t go any further. No pencils, otherwise you lose the virgin moment. I was using a pen, although sometimes I’d whack the art with a brush, when I wanted a big flash of ink, because it explodes on the paper. The drawings were what we call A-1 size over here — that’s American letter-size paper, times eight.

The idea of the cover was a motorbike flying over the journalists in a bar. There was also a landscape, a bit of sky. But the rider was completely attached to his motorbike, almost swallowed up by his gearbox. The second cover, for Part Two of “Fear and Loathing,” the magazine chose the picture of the 250-pound Texan necking with his wife in the back row. After those two issues, Rolling Stone had a blueprint of where to go next: It wasn’t only rock & roll, but something different, something social and political.

It was wonderful to do printing that was so primitive — and to finally have a job where the remit was to be weird.”

Literary Passings: Gene Wolfe

Sci-fi master Gene Wolfe passed away in April of this year.

Here’s a link to our holdings at the library.

From this obituary:

Between 1970 or so and the turn of the century, through a seemingly unending flow of novels and stories, the American science fiction writer Gene Wolfe, who has died aged 87, enjoyed a creative prime more intense and rewarding than any of his contempories.

Wolfe became famous for the polish and skill of his more conventional seeming sci-fi, though even early readers detected complexities under the surface. There were hints of the more hidden master, a dark artificer whose haunted, potent myths about human destiny have increasingly attracted the kind of intense study more usually given to authors outside the sci-fi field such as William Gaddis or Thomas Pynchon.

In Wolfe’s work, some very deep issues of identity and destiny secretly shape that dream. Seemingly innocent children who know us too well were frequently found in his early work, though he almost never wrote for younger readers. The tales assembled in The Island of Doctor Death and Other Stories and Other Stories (1980) and The Wolfe Archipelago (1983) are exemplary.

His full-length fiction plumbs the same depths, but expresses the soundings very differently. The finest of his novels, some of them published in several volumes, are invariably told in the first person by highly unreliable narrators, no longer children, ancient beyond their years. Usually their stories are presented as manuscripts passed down to us over time through unknown channels.

 

How to Use Google Scholar (Or Not)

Google Scholar searches the contents of many (but not all) academic journals. However, it does not provide access to the fulltext material. If you are off-campus, you will be prompted to log in or buy the article.

If you follow the Alkek Library link to Google Scholar here, you will have to sign in ONCE with your NET ID and then it’s all clear sailing.

In any case, please don’t buy the article – you can get it through us.  If you hit a dead end, use interlibrary loan.

Google Scholar does not search ALL the scholarly literature because some publishers restrict access.

RefWorks Webinar: Organize and Manage your citations!

Refworks2
If you’ve putting off organizing all those citations and articles you’ve gathered throughout the year, join us for some Summer Cleaning! Learn how to use RefWorks to organize, manage, preserve, and share your research and citations.

Signup for the Wednesday June 26th Webinar here: https://signup.txstate.edu/sessions/5130-refworks